Monday, August 21, 2017

Proofreading Tips

I read a blog recently where the established author had received her galleys--the final version of a soon-to-be published novel which the author must proofread for one last time.  She was concerned because she’d always received paper copies, but this galley was digital.  

She wasn’t comfortable working on the computer screen so she had the book printed out.  

All five of my novels have been digital galleys so here’s some of my tricks for proofing digital copy.  It works just as well when you proof your work in progress.


  • Use text to speech, all computers come with it, to have your computer read it aloud.  In the preferences, set the talking speed a bit faster than usual so you won't lose focus.  Use a voice that doesn't lull you to sleep.
  • Change the font and text size.  Make it much bigger than normal so those misplaced commas really stand out.  If you begin to skim, change the size again.  
  • If you see examples of lines shorter than they should be because of a misplaced paragraph break, make the text much bigger and scroll the manuscript slowly to look for other examples.  This is often caused by someone's software putting a paragraph break at the end of each page.
  • If the galley or your software puts in hyphens and word breaks for a neat presentation, do a search for vestigial hyphens.  NEVER USE THE HYPHEN FEATURE ON ANY MANUSCRIPT YOU ARE WORKING ON.
  • If you have an ereader, transfer your book to it.  The different screen makes mistakes more noticeable.  
  • Take breaks.

  • And the most important tip:  Don’t leave the edits to the last moment.

Monday, August 14, 2017

The Writer and Criticism

In the early days of writers' lives, our works are our babies, and no one wants to be told that the baby is ugly, or has bad manners, or isn't the brightest tot on the block.  It's hard sometimes even for a pro writer to remember that the work isn't really our baby, and we must learn to separate ourselves from our work.

The trick with writing and publishing is to remember that criticism is about the work, NOT ABOUT THE WRITER.  Criticism, constructive or otherwise, also isn't about the dream of being a writer, it's just another part of the work of being a writer.

Learning writing craft is similar to what an athlete does to become good at his game.  We start out with no skills but work until each necessary skill reaches a certain level of competence. 

It requires practice, even more practice, sweat, pain, criticism, the pained self-knowledge that we are not perfect, and a realization that the dream of being published or being on the team doesn't magically happen.  Then the cycle begins all over again as we grow as athletes  or writers. 

As a writer, you may choose to dream the dream and expect the writing and publishing fairy to touch you with her wand to make your dream to come true.  (Reality check: this will never happen.)  Or you can choose to buckle down to the hard work, the criticism, and the incredible learning curve of creating publishable craft so that your dream will come true.  

The criticism, both positive and negative, will never go away if you choose to be a writer.  You need only read the cruel Amazon reviews of some of the best writers to see that even fame, fortune, and success have an ugly side.  Or listen to the stories from pro writers who have to deal with incompetent or control freaks editors and publishers.

The work of improving craft never goes away. It is the same whether you are a newbie without a clue or an established writer.  Nora Roberts and Stephen King have said so, and I imagine any other writer you respect has said the same thing at one time or the other.

Dreaming the dream with no work or emotional toughness may be fine in the short term, but in the long term that dream attracts the predators-- the scam agents, fake contests, and crooked publishers-- who convince you that you are perfect then suck money and your dreams right out of you until even the writing is no longer enough, and the dream becomes a nightmare.  


If you love the writing and want to be published, you need to decide if it's a goal worth fighting for as well as a goal worth the time and distress of learning the craft and putting up with the shit.  If it isn't,  you need to find another goal worth the effort.  

Monday, August 7, 2017

Bad Things and Good Characters

Writers are told to make things hard for their characters.  They must heap on the problems so that moving forward toward a goal becomes increasingly difficult for the characters.  That’s good advice, but there are problems, then there are problems.

The problems presented should be logical within the plot, as well as reasonable.  If a character is on the way to rescue his girlfriend from a bad guy and his car won’t start, you should have shown that his car was prone to starting problems or he’d been in a car chase being shot at earlier, and, unknown to him, his gas tank had been slightly nicked, and now a puddle of gas is on the ground.  

An occasional problem may come out of nowhere, life is like that, but try to keep these down to a minimal. 

Bad things out of nowhere as plot stalling tactics simply don’t work.  Let your hero face obstacles that mean something, that stand legitimately in the way of his goal.  Your character defeating a true obstacle means something to the reader.  A false obstacle means nothing.  


Monday, July 31, 2017

The Back Plot Thickens

Tell me the plot of "The Hound of the Baskervilles." 

Easy enough, you say. A country doctor comes to Sherlock Holmes and Watson. The local lord has died of heart failure. But there were a giant hound's tracks near his body, and there's this family legend about....

But is that the only plot? 

Not really. Long before old Sir Charles is frightened to death by a hound, there is a man in South America, a distant relative of Sir Charles, who decides he will be the new lord of Baskerville Hall so he changes his name, makes his wife pretend to be his sister, and....

Some mystery writers call this second storyline the back plot. It is the story behind the story. The detective's plot is the discovery of the back plot. Holmes must reconstruct the murderer's back plot through the clues left behind. He must understand what happened before.

This twining together of two plots is the glory of the mystery and the agony of the mystery writer for she must not only have one plot which is logical and interesting. She must also create a second which intersects it backwards in time.

No, that's not crazy. Think about it. A murder occurs, and the detective investigates. He finds clues, and these clues point toward the past of the victim and the murderer. The detective must decipher these clues to discover the who, what, when, where, and why of the murder. He must travel back in time to the murderer and his motives. 

Holmes studies the crime scene, the stories of the butterfly collector, the sounds of the moor, and the ancestor's portrait, as well as other clues, to find that distant Baskerville relative who has designs on the family fortune.

How does a writer create these two plot lines? The answer to that is as diverse as the authors questioned. Some create the back story, pick the relevant clues to pepper the novel with, then set their detective to work.

Other writers are as surprised as their detective at the murder scene and never guess the killer until the last chapter. Somehow the clues, through the miracle of the writer's subconscious and a little judicious rewriting, have pointed to the murderer all along.

Still other writers mix a little of both methods. Cold calculations about clues and the killer's identity are leavened by the spontaneous generosity of the writer's muse. The writer is as surprised as the reader to discover why the killer hums but never sings and how that fits so perfectly into the puzzle.

No one can tell you what method to use to create a perfect blend of detective's plot and back plot. Each writer must discover what works best for her. But the wise writer takes the time after the book is written and before the rewriting to ask herself, "What is the plot? Does it make sense? Is it complete?"

Then the even wiser writer asks the same questions about the back plot. The wisest writer also remembers that in the back plot the killer is the major protagonist, and it here where the true heart of the novel lies.


Now tell me the plot of "The Hound of the Baskervilles."

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Link Resources of Interest

For my readers looking for a replacement for my discontinued "Links of Interest" posts.

I have gone through all my weekly resources, and I’ve included them below.  (Yes, I really did go through almost a hundred emails and websites each week.)  With most, you can opt for an email for each article or a Twitter alert so you don’t have to troll a bunch of sites every week.  

If there’s a particular subject you are interested in, you can also use the search engine for my site which will lead you to specific links. I have tried to include keywords like “Promo” in my link descriptions, and you can use words like “Facebook” when researching social media.

And, as always, I am your greatest resource for writing questions.  All you have to do is ask via my blog or email, and I will answer or point you at an answer.


Database of Writing Articles:



The Best Sites for Weekly Links

ELIZABETH SPANN CRAIG (ARTICLES AND LINKS TO OTHER ARTICLES EACH WEEK):


BOOK DESIGNER (ARTICLES AND LINKS TO OTHER ARTICLES EACH WEEK):


ADVENTURES IN CHILDREN’S PUBLISHING:



Other Resources

FICTION UNIVERSITY:


WRITERS HELPING WRITERS (ARTICLES & LISTS OF CHARACTER EMOTIONS):


WRITER UNBOXED:


STEVEN PRESSFIELD:


DAILY WRITING TIPS (GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY):


ROMANCE UNIVERSITY:


THE BLOOD RED PENCIL:


THE WRITER’S ALLEY:


THE WRITING DESK:


THE KILLZONE:


BABBLES FROM AGENT SCOTT EAGAN:


HOW TO PLAN AND DEVELOP A BOOK:


WRITER’S DIGEST EDITOR BLOGS:


WRITE TO DONE:


BUILD BOOK BUZZ (PROMO):


STANDOUT BOOKS, (SELF-PUBLISHING AND WRITING ADVICE):


BUSINESS MUSINGS (BUSINESS OF WRITING):


SELF-PUBLISHING ADVICE:


KRISTEN LAMB (WRITING AND PROMO ADVICE):


ANNE ALLEN:


LIVE WRITE THRIVE:


ALL WRITE — FICTION ADVICE:


THE DIGITAL READER (PUBLISHING, COPYRIGHT, AND HISTORICAL RESOURCES):


JAMI GOLD:


WRITER BEWARE (WARNINGS AND NEWS OF SCAMS, ETC.):


THE WRITE EDITING:



Monday, July 24, 2017

And the Survey Says

A special thanks to those who voted to continue my “Links of Interest,” or told me why they no longer read them.

A grand total of three wanted “Links” to continue.  In other words, the link blogs are definitely not of interest to a vast majority of my readers.

I am not, however, leaving those who want fresh links without recourse.  On Wednesday, I will post all my resources for links, will recommend the best, and explain how to find link resources on my blog.  

Thanks, again, to those who replied to my survey, and remember to recommend my blog articles to your friends so I can continue to do them.


Marilynn

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Links of Interest

This is your last chance to ask for more links articles. If I don’t get a bunch more votes to continue, “Links of Interest” will be no more.  If you’d like me to continue them, please leave a note below and let me know.  

Plus, how about sharing my articles with writing friends, etc., so I have some reason to continue those as well.  As always, remember that I am more than happy to answer writing questions so please ask.  

MYSTERY CLICHES:


PROMO, ADVERTISING BASICS:


BACKSTORY THAT THE READER WANTS:


WHY YOUR CHARACTER SHOULD HAVE A PAST WOUND:


THE FICTIONAL MONTAGE:


ELEVEN STEPS TO CREATE A GREAT FIGHT SCENE:


HOW TO USE A BETA READER:


DO OR SHOULD YOU USE SWEAR WORDS IN YOUR WORK?


DEVELOPING YOUR CHARACTER:


CREATING DRAMA IN FICTION:


RESEARCH, GEORGIA HISTORICAL NEWSPAPERS ONLINE:


SIX THINGS TO IMPROVE VOICE:


BRANDING, PEN NAMES, AND READER BETRAYAL: